Archive of Past Presentations

The Beginnings, Current Status, and Next Steps of PLSR

Friday, August 25, 2017

Panelists:

  • John DeBacher, Director, Public Library Development, Division for Libraries and Technology; DPI Liaison to the PLSR Steering Committee
  • Tasha Saecker, Assistant Director, Appleton Public Library; PLSR ILL/ILS Workgroup Facilitator
  • John Thompson, Director, Indianhead Federated Library System; PLSR Steering Committee Chair

The Public Library System Redesign (PLSR) Steering Committee and workgroups have been working on new coordinated service model concepts over the last year and during this next year, with continued input from our library community, will be more fully developing their model ideas. The goal of the process is to identify models to maximize the investments made into coordinated services and to improve services to public libraries and the citizens of Wisconsin.  In addition to providing background about PLSR, participants from the Steering Committee, workgroup leadership and the Department of Public Instruction will provide an update on the progress of the project to date.  This will include the status of activities and model development of the workgroups, the Steering Committee’s process and timeline, and how you can be involved!  To learn more about PLSR, please visit: www.plsr.info.

 

Everyday Advocacy

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Presented by: Donna McDonald, Director of the Arkansas River Valley Regional Library System

Many public library users are unaware of the funding challenges faced by their local libraries. As library board or Friends group members, part of your responsibility is to advocate for your library at the local, county, and state level. In this webinar, you'll learn about some common perceptions about advocacy, develop your proactive advocacy skills, and learn how to use the "Pixar Pitch" to tell your library's story, and more. 
 

Notes:

Engaging Your Board, Staff, and Community in Strategic Planning

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Presented by: Sarah Armstrong, Sarah Keister Armstrong & Associates and John Keister, John Keister & Associates
Chicago, IL


To remain a cornerstone of community information, learning and culture, today’s library must strategically position itself to adapt to changes in its service area, technology, and the library industry. A successful strategic plan must reflect the thoughts of all of its key stakeholders—users, taxpayers, leadership, staff and community partners—in addition to the larger trends at play in society.

To do that, we recommend that public libraries solicit feedback and evaluate their community's needs.  Engagement from the board, staff, and community will provide a framework for the library to define its vision and strategic organizational goals most effectively according to the needs of its community, help position it to react to changing trends in the future, and produce actionable goals to guide decisions about collections, technology, staffing, and facilities.    

When their operations are aligned with community needs, libraries can be transformational institutions. Learn how to engage your library's stakeholders - from your board to your staff to the community you serve - to best plan for your library's future.
 

Policies for Results

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Presented by: Bonnie McKewon
Consultant, State Library of Iowa

Policies for Results is a fresh way of approaching policy development by looking at constructing policies in 4 parts: the philosophy statement, the regulations, the procedures, and the guidelines. Learn how to apply the 4 parts of a policy to a sample topic. Review the board's role in policy development, along with the roles played by the library director and staff. And share your policy pet peeves! Based on the book from the Public Library Association, Creating Policies for Results: From Chaos to Clarity.

How to Turn Your Library Board into an Effective Team

Monday, August 21, 2017

Presenter: Amy Climer, Climer Consulting, Asheville, NC

High-performing boards are also high-performing teams. However, just like other types of teams, boards can be challenging. At times, collaboration can lead to innovative, amazing solutions that one person alone could not have created. On the other hand, boards can get caught up in ineffective conflict, resentment, and decreased effectiveness. In this workshop, we will explore the research and best practices on leading teams and how that applies to library boards. We will examine what makes teams effective and successful, and what makes them fall flat. You will have the opportunity to analyze your board to determine how it can become more effective and successful. You will leave with an action plan for your next steps to making your board into a high-performing team.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the behaviors and practices of successful teams and boards
  • Learn research-based advice to make your trustee board more effective
  • Create an action plan to begin the process of helping your board become more effective
Notes:

Comedy is 'What" I Do, Michael Jr.; Video shared during the webinar that is not in the recording